In the next few years, an innovative wearable device that can spot Alzheimer’s early could be possible!

Research

Researchers at the Edon project, (Early Detection of Neurodegenerative diseases) are currently developing a wearable device that could spot the early signs of Alzheimer’s.  In a three-year study researcher will analysing data from studies into the condition, the device will collect data linked to our heart rate, gait and sleep patterns. 

In previous research studies it has been shown that changes in cognitive, motor and sensory functions often occur years before the earliest symptoms are spotted. Having a device that could spot them would make early diagnosis and prevention so much easier.

Collaboration is key

Initially the Edon project which is funded and supported by Alzheimer’s Research UK, Bill Gates and Iceland Foods Charitable foundation, will work with the national institute for data science and artificial intelligence, The Alan Turing Institute, to analyse data.

What does EDoN do?

EDoN brings together global experts in data science, digital technology and neurodegeneration to collect and decode huge amounts of digital health data generously donated by people like you.

We aim to develop digital data fingerprints that pick up the earliest changes in the brain in diseases like Alzheimer’s and can be built into wearable technologies like watches or headbands.

These fingerprints could transform research efforts today, helping scientists make faster breakthroughs in understanding the disease and testing potential new preventions and treatments.

Who are EDoN? Let Stephen Fry explain

Prof Chris Holmes, health programme director at the institute, said, “Artificial intelligence has the potential to transform the learning opportunities from large-scale data studies such as Edon by integrating information from multiple sources. “We will use AI to deliver new insights into the early signals of disease by combining digital data measurements with traditional sources such as brain imaging and memory tests.”

For more information about this project please click here